From the Archive: Harvest Season

by Tiffani Righero, Research Assistant, Local History Archive

I grew up in an agriculture town in Northern California and always enjoyed the smells, sounds, and sights of harvest season which starts with peaches at the end of July and finishes with walnuts at the end of October.  Missing these images of harvest back home, I flipped though our photograph files at the Fort Collins Local History Archive and found some great images of harvest season in Northern Colorado’s past.  These photographs show various steps in the process of harvesting including picking, baling, bagging, and selling.

This cheery young girl was an apple picker ready to go with her bag at McClelland Orchard.  The McClelland’s grew many crops on their farm which was near today’s intersection of Harmony and College.

William F. Bentledge stood on top of the separator during the threshing and bagging of grain circa 1918.  Threshing is the process where the edible part of the grain is loosened from the inedible outer casing.

Here you can see the hay stacker with a lot of work ahead. The photograph was taken before 1922 on the Coy Farm which was located where the Link N Greens Golf Course is currently located on the southwest corner of Lemay and Lincoln.

Burlap sacks of onions await pick up at this field on the Coy Farm.

Cooper Edwards stands here in 1918 with a potato harvest, all bagged and ready to sell.  The crop was grown at a farm in Wellington and brought to Fort Collins possibly to be sold to Palace Grocery. It looks like the potatoes were parked on Oak Street next to Lincoln Park (today’s Library Park).

Here you can see farmers throw down the tailgate to sell some of their corn.  This photograph was taken at the Farmers’ Market at the Larimer County Courthouse parking lot in the 1980s.

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1 Response to “From the Archive: Harvest Season”


  1. 1 Katie November 1, 2010 at 9:33 am

    What fantastic photos! I especially love the one of the little girl apple picking.

    Where I grew up in Massachusetts, I remember mountains of pumpkins every year. It would be time for Halloween and we’d drive to a farm and it just boggled the mind thinking of how you’d ever be able to chose one out of what seemed like millions. That’s partially to the blame for the fact that we’d always go home with around six.


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